Over the Fiscal Cliff, Or There And Back Again

As this column is being written America is preparing to head down the, theatrically styled, “Fiscal Cliff.” That “cliff” really is the chicken roost of 40 years of mostly disappointing — and more than a decade of catastrophic — economic growth. Lousy growth leads to a diminished tax base, capable of producing only anemic tax revenues. Washington, DC is emulating Sherlock Holmes locked in mortal combat with its own Moriarity-style criminal mastermind: the Deficit. In its own re-enactment of The Final Problem Washington disappears — whether by rappelling in a mini-deal, or hurtling — over its own Reichenbach Falls: The Fiscal Cliff. Holmes later is found to have survived. So will Washington. Spoiler Alert: Here’s how we actually will climb out. It will have nothing to do with what happens in the next few days. The solution revolves around this Sherlock Holmes axiom: “Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth,” as Holmes observed in A Scandal in Bohemia. The 113th Congress is preparing to forsake the 112th’s fixation on the impossible. All but unnoticed by a Washington press corps obsessed by celebrities and melodrama the GOP has generated an impressive new set of leaders. These leaders will make the House turn its power toward creating an economic climate to sustain growth. The media’s focus on politicos associated with impossible budget policy will wane. The national focus will shift to officials committed to generating real equitable prosperity through healthy free markets, a climate that will melt the deficit. This almost certainly will begin with monetary reform. A “Monetary Policy Reform Express” already is barreling down...

Grassroot Perspective: The One You Love, Solar Tax Credits and Ron Paul says America is off the cliff

A weekly liberty briefing and news guide to keep you informed and prepared on what’s UP to more freedom or DOWN to bigger, more intrusive government. Quote of the Week: “A free market grants no authority or privileges to labor unions or business. All contracts between workers and businesses must be mutually agreeable and without government mandates. No one is forced to work, no one is prevented from quitting, and the wages are to be set by mutual agreement. All workers are free to organize and collectively negotiate with employees. Employees have a right to participate or not. Government workers have no power to force obscene wages on the taxpayers and should not be given a contractual right to strike and hold the taxpayers hostage.” – Rep. Ron Paul Local News Election 2012 Is Over, What’s Next? Once again, another election is finally over here in Hawaii and across America. So much time, emotion and money often hangs on these races, and more often than not our future leaders are determined by capricious voting and sometimes sheer luck. But just as the 1980s Glenn Frey song goes, “someone’s gonna cry when they know they’ve lost you, someone’s gonna thank the stars above.” Some are overjoyed, others are angry at the results from this week’s election, but what does it mean for you and me? ANALYSIS: Personality politics aside, both Hawaii and the United States at large are in deep fiscal trouble. The Federal government is pushing close to $17 trillion dollars in debt and in spite of talk of “cutting spending” new mandates both in Washington and here in Hawaii will...

Grassroot Perspective: Land of the Sorta Free, Compromise and Agree with Me, and More

This column was originally published here on Hawaii Reporter. Scanning the week’s national news, views and clues with you and yours in mind Quote of the Week: “The good news is that, according to the Obama administration, the rich will pay for everything. The bad news is that, according to the Obama administration, you’re rich. “–P. J. O’Rourke  Each week, we’ll be monitoring the web to find the most interesting, challenging, or important items for those who are concerned about liberty, accountability, and big government.  Here are some of the highlights from the past week: Land of the Somewhat Free It will come as no surprise that Americacontinues its mediocre performance on the Fraser Institute’s Economic Freedom of the World 2012 index.  After climbing to the top 5 between 1980 and 2000, we dropped to 8th in 2005, and now sit at an embarrassing 18th place.  What figures into their assessment?  Things like size of government, sound money, regulation, and freedom to trade internationally.  So it’s not hard to figure out what has happened in the last several years that has caused the precipitous decline.  The size of our government has ballooned, and the current administration (whose anti-obesity campaign should really be aimed at federal government programs) is intent on growing it more.  Our monetary policy seems as though it was designed by a drunk man playing darts at 3am.  And our bloated federal agencies continue to try to justify their existence (and increase their power by stealth) by increasing our regulatory burden. The greatest irony of all is that all of these changes were sold to the American people...
Grassroot Perspective: 16 and a lot of 000s, Bias Blindness, and More

Grassroot Perspective: 16 and a lot of 000s, Bias Blindness, and More

This article originally appeared in Hawaii Reporter. Scanning the week’s national news, views and clues with you and yours in mind By Malia Hill Quote of the Week: “In the lexicon of the political class, the word “sacrifice” means that the citizens are supposed to mail even more of their income to Washington so that the political class will not have to sacrifice the pleasure of spending it.”—George Will Each week, we’ll be monitoring the web to find the most interesting, challenging, or important items for those who are concerned about liberty, accountability, and big government.  Here are some of the highlights from the past week: 16 and a lot of 000s $16,000,000,000,000.   That’s a dizzying number of zeros.  And it’s the number that the national debt reached this last week.  Sure, it would be easier to read if I just said “sixteen trillion dollars,” but one of my personal peeves with the way that government and money are discussed is the fact that we tend to talk about such astronomical sums that the whole thing becomes somewhat abstract and untouchable.  What are we ordinary folk gonna do about $16 trillion? Well, you’re going to end up paying it.  Or some of it, anyway.  At the current population of the US, the national debt is now more than $50,000 for every man, woman, and child living in our country.  In terms of debt per taxpayer, it’s more than $111,000 and counting.  It’s more than our Gross Domestic Product—that is, the value of everything produced in our economy. Oh, and it has gone up by more than $6 trillion during the...