The Adventures of Jonathan Gullible

The Adventures of Jonathan Gullible

Have you met Jonathan Gullible?  In the best Swiftian tradition, The Adventures of Jonathan Gullible is both a primer and a commentary on the value of the free market.  It tells the story of a boy who becomes shipwrecked on an unfamiliar island after being swept out to sea in a storm. Having previously lived in a relatively free society, in this new strange land he experiences culture shock as he learns learns of bewildering laws and traditions of the islands inhabitants. The story highlights the absurdities of the laws, the controls imposed on people’s lives, and the economic drawbacks of these laws. The laws highlighted are recognizable as common to many countries throughout the world. As the story unfolds, the part individuals in society play in political decision-making and personal responsibility is introduced for discussion. And it’s local!  Written by Grassroot Institute member and Hawaii Pacific University Professor Ken Schoolland, Jonathan Gullible actually grew out of a series of economic and political commentaries for KHVH.  Since then, it has been published in 45 languages, produced as a play in three countries, been used as an undergraduate economics text, and garnered acclaim from numerous free market advocates, from John Stossel to Milton Friedman. Steve Forbes said of it that, “If policymakers read – and absorbed the lessons of – this book, how much better the U.S. and the world would be. Free markets, with sensible rules of the road, are moral because they unleash the productive, creative powers of people in ways that benefit everybody. This book is particularly timely.” Want to learn more about it?  You can visit the website at JonathanGullible.com or just click here...

Ron Paul’s Farewell Speech

Food for thought–the farewell remarks given by Rep. Ron Paul on the House floor Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012.  (Transcript below.)  What do you think about the issues Paul raises?           Transcript (from the Washington Examiner): This may well be the last time I speak on the House Floor.  At the end of the year I’ll leave Congress after 23 years in office over a 36 year period.  My goals in 1976 were the same as they are today:  promote peace and prosperity by a strict adherence to the principles of individual liberty. It was my opinion, that the course the U.S. embarked on in the latter part of the 20th Century would bring us a major financial crisis and engulf us in a foreign policy that would overextend us and undermine our national security. To achieve the goals I sought, government would have had to shrink in size and scope, reduce spending, change the monetary system, and reject the unsustainable costs of policing the world and expanding the American Empire. The problems seemed to be overwhelming and impossible to solve, yet from my view point, just following the constraints placed on the federal government by the Constitution would have been a good place to start. In many ways, according to conventional wisdom, my off-and-on career in Congress, from 1976 to 2012, accomplished very little.  No named legislation, no named federal buildings or highways—thank goodness.  In spite of my efforts, the government has grown exponentially, taxes remain excessive, and the prolific increase of incomprehensible regulations continues.  Wars are constant and pursued without Congressional declaration, deficits rise...